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Updated: Suspect Was In Jail Because Of Conditions Of Release

Updated: Suspect Was In Jail Because Of Conditions Of Release

An alleged ankle bracelet shortage has nothing to do with why shovel beating suspect Justin Hansen remains in jail.

It’s official. An alleged ankle bracelet shortage has nothing to do with why shovel beating suspect Justin Hansen stayed in jail for a week.

The reason he remained behind bars is likely due to the strict conditions of release set for him last week by state District Court Judge Charles Brown. Hansen was released from jail Tuesday.

Chief District Court Judge Nan Nash told ABQ Free Press that while the court’s Pretrial Services Division has a limited supply of the bracelets, that’s not why Hansen is still in jail.

“Judge Brown set some very strict conditions of release and all of those have to be complied with before he [Hansen] can be released,” Nash said.

Those conditions include GPS monitoring and the requirement that Hansen find someone to live with who can supervise him 24 hours a day. Those conditions are also subject to the approval of the Pretrial Services Division.

Hansen, 33, is accused of attempting to murder Brittani Marcell in 2008 by beating her with a shovel. He was still in custody at Metro Detention when we checked this morning.

Many media outlets reported last week that Brown had ordered Hansen’s release, but they failed to mention the strict conditions of release. And some outlets said that Hansen was still in jail because of a shortage of ankle bracelets.

Nash said that she and other judges will review the court’s ankle bracelet policy because it appears that judges are ordering their use too often. The GPS tracking devices are ordered in about 25 percent of the court’s felony cases, Nash said, adding that in other jurisdictions they are used in about 10 percent of cases.

“We need to look at the better use of these things,” Nash said. She added that there has been much research around the nation on their use and that developing a new policy shouldn’t take more than a couple weeks.

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Dennis Domrzalski is managing editor of ABQ Free Press. Reach him at dennis@freeabq.com.
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3 Comments

  • Garden Of Eden
    July 22, 2017, 9:53 am

    The local media is alive and well with Fake News.

    REPLY
  • Garden Of Eden
    July 22, 2017, 9:55 am

    The local media is alive and well with Fake News.

    REPLY
  • Garden Of Eden
    July 22, 2017, 9:55 am

    The local media is alive and well with Fake News.

    REPLY
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