<script async src=”//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js”></script>
<!– Front page sidebar –>
<ins class=”adsbygoogle”
style=”display:inline-block;width:300px;height:600px”
data-ad-client=”ca-pub-6727059054102892″
data-ad-slot=”4003498234″></ins>
<script>
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
</script>



See What The Solar Eclipse Will Look Like In Your Zip Code

See What The Solar Eclipse Will Look Like In Your Zip Code

New Mexico is not directly in the path and though the total phase of this solar eclipse is not visible in Albuquerque, it can be observed here.

On Monday, Aug. 21, for the first time in 99 years, a total solar eclipse will cut across the entire United States. The area where the sun is completely blocked out by the moon is only 70 miles wide, but the whole country (even Alaska and Hawaii) will experience a partial eclipse.

New Mexico is not directly in the path and though the total phase of this solar eclipse is not visible in Albuquerque, it can be observed here as a partial solar eclipse. Vox has put together an interactive tool to enter a zip code and see exactly what it’ll look like in that location.

For example, in zip code 87110, the eclipse will peak at 11:45:21 a.m. MDT, when the moon obscures 73.5 percent of the sun. If you want to see the total eclipse, you’ll need to travel 483 miles NE.

To see how the eclipse experience will vary across the country, try different zip codes. Salem, Oregon (97301), is going to see a total eclipse, while Downtown Los Angeles (90012) will see 62 percent of the sun blocked at the peak. In Lake Charles, Louisiana (70601), it’ll be 71 percent.

In Goreville, Illinois, a town of 1,067 lucky people, the eclipse will last for the longest period, over two-and-a-half minutes.

If you’re looking to find a place with little cloud cover, it can be hard to predict.

But the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has crunched their data on the average cloud cover that typically occurs Aug. 21. The darker the dot, the greater chance of clouds.

Just be careful: It’s not safe to stare directly into the sun without special viewing glasses. Find out where to buy them in Albuquerque. The next solar eclipse over the U.S. will be in 2024.

The following two tabs change content below.
Albuquerque’s definitive alternative newspaper publishing an inquisitive, modern approach to the news and entertainment stories that matter most to New Mexicans. ABQ Free Press’ fresh voice speaks to insightful and involved professionals who care deeply about our community.

Latest posts by ABQ Free Press (see all)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply
The following two tabs change content below.
Dennis Domrzalski is managing editor of ABQ Free Press. Reach him at dennis@freeabq.com.

Latest posts by Dennis Domrzalski (see all)