<script async src=”//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js”></script>
<!– Front page sidebar –>
<ins class=”adsbygoogle”
style=”display:inline-block;width:300px;height:600px”
data-ad-client=”ca-pub-6727059054102892″
data-ad-slot=”4003498234″></ins>
<script>
(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});
</script>



Harvard Uses ABQ Free Press’ Civil Asset Forfeiture Story

Harvard Uses ABQ Free Press’ Civil Asset Forfeiture Story

We appreciate the Fair Punishment Project citing our story.

ABQ Free Press has gone national. That’s right, national.

Harvard University just cited one of our stories in a blog by its law school’s Fair Punishment Project. The blog, by Carimah Townes, talks about civil asset forfeiture and the response by Albuquerque’s mayoral candidates to our rolling forum question about it.

Here’s a quote from the blog:

“Now, more than two years after New Mexico banned civil asset forfeiture, there’s a possibility that Albuquerque will fall into line with the statewide effort to end the practice. During a mayoral candidate email forum last week, the Albuquerque Free Press asked nine candidates whether they would continue to defy the clear spirit of the state law — and seven said they would end it altogether.

“The mayoral election results could be a litmus test for the future of civil forfeiture in New Mexico. Albuquerque has already been sued two times for continuing the practice after state law was changed in 2015. The city’s position has been that the practice isn’t actually ‘civil asset forfeiture’ at all, but rather ‘a narrowly-tailored nuisance abatement law to protect the public from dangerous, repeat DWI offenders and the vehicles they use committing DWI offenses, placing innocent citizens’ lives and property at risk.’

“If one of the seven mayoral candidates in favor of ending the practice wins, Albuquerque could send a message to other cities in the state, including capital city Santa Fe, that civil forfeiture will no longer be tolerated. Such a move would bring New Mexico one step closer to truly ending the practice for good.”

We appreciate the Fair Punishment Project citing our story.

The following two tabs change content below.
Dennis Domrzalski is managing editor of ABQ Free Press. Reach him at dennis@freeabq.com.

Latest posts by Dennis Domrzalski (see all)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply
The following two tabs change content below.
Dennis Domrzalski is managing editor of ABQ Free Press. Reach him at dennis@freeabq.com.

Latest posts by Dennis Domrzalski (see all)